Blog, Culture, Free Resources

2019 Report: The State of Diversity in Tech

You’ve probably seen the stats. Stats like:

  • Women in STEM, on average, make $16,000 less than men 1
  • Only 39% of entry-level jobs in tech are held by women 2
  • Only 12% of all tech and computer science positions are held by black or Latinx women 3

So obviously there are problems with diversity and inclusion in the tech world. BIG problems. It doesn’t matter if we’re focusing on: race, gender identity, sexual orientation, disabilities, age, parenting or caregiving status.

The tech field simply isn’t doing enough to be inclusive.

At Skillcrush, we wanted to dive deeper to better understand the current state of diversity in tech, so we designed a survey that would do just that.

We asked a group of over 600 women and nonbinary individuals what they think about diversity and inclusion in the tech world. What are their career goals? What does diversity and inclusion mean to them? What barriers have they experienced in the tech world and how can we help?

Their answers were surprising. They were upsetting. And, at times, they were incredibly frustrating to read.

Answers like:

  • “I think it is even harder for [women of color] to feel accepted and welcomed in the tech culture,”
  • “I definitely felt like I was looked at as not as smart as male coworkers,”
  • And the nearly 70% of respondents that believe the tech world has a motherhood penalty.

But there was also optimism sprinkled in their responses that can motivate underrepresented groups and allies to keep fighting to create a better experience for anyone who’s ever felt marginalized in the tech world.

Whether good, bad, or somewhere in between, we hope these insights will help further the conversation and encourage action around diversity and inclusion within the tech industry.


  1. WIRED
  2. Women in the workplace survey, 2018
  3. Arizona State University study, 2018

Lori Fimoff

Lori is the Sales Content Specialist here at Skillcrush. A former sign language interpreter, Lori made the switch to the digital world several years ago and loves helping others do the same. Lori has a passion for storytelling and spends her spare time creating stop motion videos, dreaming up her next travel adventure, and singing any chance she gets (good thing her neighbors don’t seem to mind!).